Landivar Architects have collaborated with the Gingerman Restaurant Group to deliver the fit-out and interior Architecture detailing of the new build ‘Flint House’ restaurant, as part of the broader regeneration of the Hanningtons Estate, sited in the South Lanes, Brighton, Sussex. The restaurant, cocktail bar and terrace are positioned over two floors and located along a newly formed ‘twitten’ within the historic lanes. With visually open kitchen and counter level dining, the interior, incorporates commercial kitchen apparatus, with bespoke furniture, bars and hand crafted detailing. The interior forms a welcoming, open and light space for informal and convivial dining.

The vast majority of elements within the design are bespoke and procured locally by highly skilled crafts people. This includes the construction of the bar counter and kitchen on the ground floor, finished with patinated zinc, matt black shell tiles and marine green glazed horizontally stacked hand made tiles.The upper floor area houses a smaller cocktail serving counter, W.C. facilities, additional seating and access to the roof top terrace. Again, all with bespoke detailing to provide a light and contemporary dining experience.

  • Bespoke detailing of interior elements, locally sourced and fabricated by Method furniture makers.
  • Open plan kitchen with induction cooking hobs.
  • The proposed planting scheme to the gardens includes native shrubs and perennials and is designed to improve the biodiversity of the site.
  • The Carbon footprint has been considered at an early stage of the design and has formed a basis for the choice of materials pallette. Where ever possible,locally sourced materials have been specified. All labour for the fit out has been provided by local craftsmen.
  • External walls and glazing are highly insulated with a central Air Source Heat Pump (ASHP) system providing effecient, sustainable heating and hot water throughout.

Photography by Emma Marshall. https://emmamarshall.net/

View website: http://www.flinthousebrighton.com/

https://www.methodfurnituremakers.co.uk/

Jay Rayner – Guardian review: https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/oct/13/the-flint-house-brighton-its-about-satisfying-dishes-restaurant-review

Saxon works housing development is a development of 33 apartments and mixed use commercial space

The site is located within Aldrington, a western suburb of Hove, within an existing commercial and residential plot to the north of Portland Road and Olive Road. Aldrington is bound to the north by the Railway, to the west by Boundary Road in Portslade and to the east by Sackville Road in Hove. The site is predominantly orthogonal in plan with a vertical strip of land running north to south alongside the private access road to the Trading Estate. – The site itself comprises a single storey open warehouse building constructed in the 1950’s, with surrounding hard landscaping and is accessed from the east, directly from Olive Road.

The demographic of the area has changed considerably over the last decade due to an influx of young professionals and families, attracted by the quality of life in Brighton and Hove and the convenient commuter links to London from the nearby stations of Aldrington and Portslade. As a result there has been a marked increase in residential demand and a consequent growth in commercial and retail development along Portland Road.

The layout and organisation of the site has been designed to optimise the residential density whilst respecting the surrounding conditions. A fundamental move involves the removal of vehicular access from the corner of Olive Road and to incorporate a vehicle and pedestrian access from the Drive Road to the north of Portland Road.

The commercial unit is located on the Portland Road frontage and relates to the urban grain of the existing houses. The scale and orientation provide a visual introduction to the site and lead the eye, via a boundary brick wall up to the main residential proposal.

The material palette of the proposal is clearly contemporary but makes reference to the surrounding buildings. The majority of the surrounding structures, both commercial and residential, are constructed of brick and this forms the basis of the elevational treatment. It is proposed to use traditional brickwork, however, bringing it in line with contemporary construction and material methods. The traditional building envelope is off-set with copper sprayed projecting balconies and expressed fair faced concrete lintels.

The form of the building is partially defined by the topography and the necessity to embed it into the landscape to achieve the subterranean parking. The primary street elevation (west) is formal to the private road side and is articulated by the stepped face detail, with exposed reconstituted stone lintel ends. The projected bays and balconies extend beyond the stepped fins providing articulation to the whole facade. The copper finished, mild steel railings and the varying brick bonds add a layering and visual interest to the facade whilst providing private amenity space to each apartment.

The large scale, copper sprayed aluminium framed fenestration, is rationally composed providing an order to the elevation and balancing the vertical and horizontal elements of the design. The fenestration has been generously applied to create high quality internal spaces that benefit from high natural lighting levels.

Saxon works housing development: Planning Committee date July 2022.

 

Developer:

https://martinhomes.co/

Similar medium density housing schemes:

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/residential-projects-by-landivar-architects/whitehawk-way/

Landivar Architects acted as lead Architects and Interior designers to deliver the Vine Street mixed use infill development in the heart of the popular North Laine district, Brighton. Located on a north – South street, surrounded by pubs, shops and restaurants, the mixed use development is designed to complement and enhance the vibrant and popular tourist destination.

The design takes its cue from the post-industrial aesthetic of the North Laine conservation area, which included small scale cottage industries. The industrial aesthetic includes the use of zinc roofing, PPC Steel windows, facing brick and render. The ground floor is allocated to 4 individual mixed use ‘Bays’ that are allocated to a restaurant, Pop up brewery, tattoo parlour and vintage furniture shop. The eclectic mix of uses complements the vibrant atmosphere of the area and facilitates the upper residential accommodation, formed of two – short stay holiday lets. The accommodation at Vine Street Studios is designed with three things in mind: the creation of a space that is as versatile as it is comfortable; the use of finishes, furnishings and fittings that surprise, inspire and delight; the notion that a weekend accommodation can – and should – look and feel just like a beautifully designed home. It includes an open plan living space, 4 sleeping double bedrooms, a self-contained annex and secure off street parking. The interior design is one of playfulness and honesty to materials, whilst also being robust designed for the relatively hard use.

Landivar Architects acted as Executive architects and interior designers for the The Vine street mixed use development to deliver the project throughout the Building Control, tender and Construction process. Preparing full working drawings and collaborating alongside the client, contractor, Building Control and the Local Authority Planning department to deliver this high quality, bespoke mixed use development in the centre of Brighton.

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

 

The conversion of a Victorian warehouse building into a 60 bed youth hostel and bar. The industrial aesthetic and fabric of the building informed the design principles of the project. A pared back and hardwearing approach to the interior finish retains the essence and integrity of the host building whilst adapting perfectly for its intended use.

View website

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

8 Hoxton Square – Bar and Restaurant:

Landivar Architects have collaborated with Cameron Emirali and Luke Wilson to create 8 Hoxton Square, a new 50-60 cover restaurant, in the heart of Shoreditch.

8 Hoxton Square, the second venture by the founders of London restaurant 10 Greek Street. https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/commercial-projects-by-landivar-architects-brighton-sussex/greek-street/

The 8 Hoxton Square – Bar and Restaurant is formed over two floors with bar and private dining areas. The interior reflect the host structure and the history of the industrial past. The approach to the wine list will also be mirrored at the restaurant, which aims to offer “exciting, regularly changing” wines, in a broad range of styles, grapes and regions, and with low mark ups. There will also be a little black book of rarer odd bottles available from the cellar.

Soho restaurant 10 Greek Street opened in 2012 to critical acclaim. The Observer’s Jay Rayner wrote at the time that there is “nothing showy about how ingredients are brought together”.

“You will not swoon at the originality of anything. There are oceans of technique but it is worn very lightly; so lightly, in fact, that it may only be as you come to the end of the meal that you will recognise how well you have been fed,” he said.

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

Guardian review by

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/apr/11/8-hoxton-square-restaurant-review-marina-oloughlin

 

 

 

10 Greek Street – Bar and Restaurant:

Landivar Architects have collaborated with Cameron Emirali and Luke Wilson to create a refreshing, relaxed and contemporary new 36 cover restaurant, in the heart of Soho.

10 Greek Street, is the first venture by the co-founders of London restaurant 8 Hoxton Square.https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/commercial-projects-by-landivar-architects-brighton-sussex/hoxton-contemporary-architects-restaurant-london/

10 Greek Street – Bar and Restaurant is formed over two floors with bar and private dining areas. The interior reflect the host structure and the history of the industrial past. The approach to the wine list will also be mirrored at the restaurant, which aims to offer “exciting, regularly changing” wines, in a broad range of styles, grapes and regions, and with low mark ups. There will also be a little black book of rarer odd bottles available from the cellar.

Bespoke interior detailing of the bar counter and kitchen has been procured by local, skilled crafts people to provide a contemporay and unique interior environment. This includes cantilevered pivoting steel and birch stools, projecting from the counter top to create a dynamic and fluid space.

The restaurant opened in 2012 to critical acclaim. The Observer’s Jay Rayner wrote at the time that there is “nothing showy about how ingredients are brought together”.

“You will not swoon at the originality of anything. There are oceans of technique but it is worn very lightly; so lightly, in fact, that it may only be as you come to the end of the meal that you will recognise how well you have been fed,” he said.

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

 

Reviews:
Guardian Life and Style. Feb 2012
Independant Food and Drinnk
Metro Lifestyle

 

 

 

 

Gingerman re-modelling and extension.

The Gingerman restaurant in Norfolk Square is the flag ship restaurant of the Gingerman restaurant group. The restaurant has been serving fine dining since 1998 and it was considered the right time re-model and enlarge the restaurant for the next decade.

As a continuation of the cuisine, a simple, high quality and carefully composed approach has been adopted for the interior, with the majority of the furniture items and bar space being bespoke for the restaurant and the space.

Landivar Architects have overseen the complete works for the Gingerman re-modelling and extension, from concept through to the construction and completion. Careful consideration has been given to the selection of materials, finishes and acoustics resulting in a relaxed, simple and bright dining space.

The extension and re-design has reinvigorated a popular fine dining restaurant in Hove, whilst maintaining the principles in which the restaurant was founded.

  • Careful consideration has been given to the acoustic performance with in the restaurant with hidden acoustic deadening materials applied within the space.
  • The original use of the structure was an old stable yard. The utilitarian aesthethic has been maintained with a simple interior contruction pallete.

 

Guardian review:  https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2005/may/22/foodanddrink.shopping2

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

Other projects for the Gingerman group:

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/commercial-projects-by-landivar-architects-brighton-sussex/flint-house-restaurant-interior-contemporary-architects-brighton/

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/commercial-projects-by-landivar-architects-brighton-sussex/ginger-pig-boutique-hotel/

 

The extension and re-design has reinvigorated a popular fine dining restaurant in Hove, whilst maintaining the principles in which the restaurant was founded.

Landivar Architects have collaborated with the Ginger group on The Ginger Pig project, which is formed of a Boutique Hotel conversion including Restaurant extension and bar – Kitchen redesign. The works have focused on the conversion of the dilapidated and disused upper floors of the restaurant to create guest accommodation along with the full redesign and extension of the existing restaurant and kitchens.

The Boutique hotel accommodation consists of 11 en-suite double rooms situated across two floors. Each suite is individually designed to create a wide variation of spaces to accommodate varying guests needs. The rooms are contemporary in design and formation, whilst respecting the existing Edwardian architecture and interior design features. Careful consideration has been given to the circulation, usability, acoustic and thermal performance of the guest rooms to ensure a high quality, robust and comfortable space. The Ginger Pig is located on Hove street, with diagonal views over the esplande and seafront.

 

Gingerman group:

‘The Ginger Pig offers guest accommodation in 11 en-suite double rooms situated across two floors. Our room style naturally follows the Ginger philosophy of simple and understated, designed with maximum comfort and enjoyment in mind.

Every room is air-conditioned and features an oversized shower or stand-alone bath tub, indulgent bathroom products, luxury Royal Warrant ‘Hypnos’ mattresses, high thread-count linen, Nespresso-style coffee machines, and premixed ‘Ginger’ cocktails’

 

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

Guarian review by:

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2017/aug/25/the-ginger-pig-hove-east-sussex-hotel-review

Additional projects for the Gingerman Group:

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/commercial-projects-by-landivar-architects-brighton-sussex/flint-house-restaurant-interior-contemporary-architects-brighton/

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/commercial-projects-by-landivar-architects-brighton-sussex/gingerman-restaurant-contemporary-architects-brighton/

68 Middle Street – Commercial work studios

Architect and Client design approach

Peter Zumthor once said that an architect should work “to develop the use of the building together with the client, in a process, so that as we go along we become more intelligent”.

And rarely has it been more apparent than working with Clearleft on their new home at 68 Middle Street. Their new offices, based in the heart of Brighton’s old quarter form a centre point of a broader facility that includes meeting rooms, forums, event spaces and an auditorium that talks just as much about the companies own intent as it does it’s relationship to the broader digital community.

As Architects’ working closely with Clearleft from the outset it became apparent that the interior of the structure had to represent, in part, the exterior face, ethos and design approach of Clearleft and as such, the importance of the challenge was set. In order to establish an understanding of common direction, we embarked on a series of works shops with Andy, Rich, Sophie and the rest of the team.

It struck us that there was a genuine involvement with everyone within Clearleft to comment and influence the design process. This democratic approach galvanized the importance of creating a space that addresses the broad needs and requirements of all of the users.

The workshops were key in enabling us to understand Clearleft as a company and for us to express our design intentions within the brief. The process of working with design-based clients has been an enriching one with many syntactical and linguistic similarities between both parties and as a result, the vision of the spaces has been formed through a dual process that is greater than the individual sums of its parts.

Certain reoccurring themes were raised that could characterise the spaces at 68 Middle Street:

  • Flexibility of space – non-proscriptive of function.
  • Transparency, interconnection of space and surface treatment.
  • Respectful informality and working practice – fun.

As a design-based group and with a closely knitted team, it was essential to be able to create an environment that was both open visually but also allowed for spontaneity and flexibility of function for the various spaces. As a result, one of the first strategic moves was to establish the walls and the floors that could be removed from the building and how they would influence the residual interconnected spaces. The original 70’s office building had a very formal and vertical arrangement with an implied hierarchical element and by removing elements we could begin to craft a working space suitable the 21st century.

In my view, the most important move was to remove a third of the floor plate from the second floor and to completely open up the rear of the structure at first floor level to open out onto a new urban roof terrace. This allowed a horizontal view of over 35 meters and the creation of a double height space that connects a glazed meeting room, steel gantry and workshop gallery space with the main Clearleft office space. On the ground floor we embarked on a similar exercise, removing all of original internal walls and re-configuring a new auditorium / gallery, bar / meeting space, meeting room and office space.

Again, the visual connections and flexibility of space was the driving factors. An example of this approach is highlighted through the client’s wish to have an articulated electric aluminium and glass ‘up and over’ door in between the bar meeting space and the meeting room. It forms a greater degree of flexibility in how the two spaces are used and creates a moment of theatre as it opens.

On establishing the spatial and organizational strategy for the project our attention turned to creating a visual language that could connect the spaces whilst having a simple material palette that would allow the users of the spaces a metaphoric canvas to project their work on.

It was decided that a modest, natural palette of birch faced ply, white board-walls, mild steel, concrete and glass would be best suited to form the canvas. The materials are all in an ‘un-finished’ state, without gloss or varnish, the materials can express their quiet quality and beauty without dominating the spaces.

With all architectural work the acid test is in its inhabitation and I truly hope that the users at Clearleft will enjoy the space as much as we have enjoyed collaborating and designing. The 68 Middle Street – Commercial work studios remain as a centre point to the Clearleft Core strategy.

 

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

 

https://clearleft.com/