Preston Park Contemporary housing scheme

The development consists of a conversion and extension of a dilapidated Victorian villa to form 6 apartments along with two new build houses to the rear.

The Victorian Villa conversion is a sensitvie historic, conservation proposal, which seeks to presrve and enhance the original Victorian structure whilst providing a mix contemporary dwellings. The proposal re-instates an important Victorian Villa within the Preston Park Conservation area. Additionally, Planning approval has been granted at Appeal for two, three bedroom semi detached houses to the rear of the Victorian Villa. The houses are constructed from a pale local brick and are designed to express the structural aspects – This is primarily based on a rythym of structural pilasters and steel beams, along with expressed internal ceiling joists and lanterns. The structural expression references to a utilitarian functional aesthetic but this off set with a series of textured brickbonds and contemporary fenestration. The houses take advantage of thee upward topography to form a stepped arrangement with the bedrooms on the lower parts and the open Living accomodation to the upper level with duel east / west aspect on glazed lantern to the circulation core. Additional key design features include.

 

  • The flat roofs are covered in a green roof hidden behind a parapet wall and planted with sedum and wild grassess. The green roof encourages site biodiversity whilst helping with surface water attenuation.
  • A number of biodiversity meares are install to provide potential homes for bats and swifts along with a series of Bee bricks.
  •   Landscaped buffers have been introduced to soften the edge between the garden and the newly converted flats to the west. This is also helped with the natural topography of the site.
  • The proposed planting scheme to the gardens includes native shrubs and perennials and is designed to improve the biodiversity of the site.
  • Hard landscaping has been minimised and free draining permeable paving has been used for the primary access. All surface water is retained on site and drained via a series of soak-aways.
  • The Carbon footprint has been considered at an early stage of the design and has formed a basis for the choice of materials pallette. Where ever possible, the design has opted for naturally load bearing elements and by using the structural capacity of the brick work, we have minimised the use of steel work to an absolute minimum. Where ever possible, timber has been specified and is to be locally sourced.
  • External walls and glazing are highly insulated with a central Air Source Heat Pump (ASHP) system providing effecient, sustainable heating and hot water throughout.
  • Passive solar gain has been utilies within the deisgn along with a passive cross venitilation system.

Preston Park Contemporary housing scheme provide effective use of a brownfield site to form two modern houses within a historic conservation area.

https://www.youarehome.uk/

Harrington Road,:
The project at Harrington Road in Brighton involved the partial restoration and refurbishment of a dilapidated Victorian villa – Phase one is now complete with phase two including a side extension and the completion of the staircase to be continued. 
The form and fabric of the forgotten dwelling was sensitively uncovered to reveal the original materials and features, to be retained where possible .The plan was then opened up considerably on the first floor to create a large luminous living area at the centre of the house with traditional sash windows to three elevations, bringing views of the surrounding trees and garden into the heart of the home.   
The bedrooms to the second floor were carefully restored with reclaimed timber boards and plaster mouldings. The loft was converted to form two smaller bedrooms and to reflect the contemporary addition, these were entirely lined with birch faced ply , creating a sculptural quality to the space.

 

The newly installed stair ( and eventual brass balustrade and railings ) forms the thread that connects all parts of the dwelling, the old and the new, the lower ground to the loft. The stair is constructed of reclaimed timber boards , as in the first floor bedrooms,  (these all came from a former tobacco factory in Liverpool) and where the stair meets each floor landing , the existing timber boards of the house have been interspersed with the tobacco stained boards, acknowledging the introduction of a contrasting yet historic material into the existing structure. 

The stair is conceived as a new sculptural element introduced into the existing historic structure and this composition of the new and the old is again acknowledged by use of a shadow gap separating the stair and the original walls all the way up from the lower ground to the loft.
Works continue to the balustrade and lower ground floors. 

 

Photography by Emma Marshall. https://emmamarshall.net/

Joinery – Stairs: http://www.methodfurnituremakers.co.uk

Landivar Architects are lead designers for a pair of contemporary urban villas located within the residential quarter of Preston park Avenue, Brighton, Sussex. The Contemporary Housing scheme constitutes the second phase of the development following the completion of the Manor House conversion to form six residential dwellings, with a completion date of June 2021.

The proposed dwellings are designed to carefully consider the topography of the back land location. Finished in sustainably grown burnt larch vertical cladding and with a series of tiered green sedum roofs, the houses are highly sustainable with an excellent enhanced biodiversity within the site. The visual impact of the proposal is kept to a minimum with the use of natural materials and sympathetic scale.

Bespoke detailling has been incoporated throughout including the kitchens, bathrooms and external doors and gate. The front doors are hand fabricated and finished in a burnished brass to complement the windows and external detailing.

The landscaping proposal for the houses has been integrated within the design to bed in the architecture whilst maintaining the privacy and screening for the occupiers amenity. Six mature existing trees provide the backbone of the landscaping scheme, which is further complimented with native species, including hawthorn, blackthorn, evergreen holly, and rambling dog rose and flowering climbers such as native honeysuckle.

The scheme benefits from thermally broken PPC metal windows and full house MVHR ventilation to provide a stable and cost effective internal environment. This is further supported by a highly insulated construction fabric and careful orientation to maximize solar gain whilst reducing heat loss, along with Air Source heat pumps and underfloor heating. Overall, sustainibility and in house environmental performace have been key considerations within the design and development of the scheme.

The three bedroom semi detached villas gently step up into the site and provide contemporary flexible residential accommodation, within a brownfield site.

https://www.youarehome.uk/

Computer Generated images by: https://www.curvedaxis.com/

Phase one Manor house conversion: https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/residential-projects-by-landivar-architects/preston-park-avenue-2/

Contemporary residential conversion of a Victorian manor house and Care home to provide 6 self contained apartments, gardnes and parking.

Landivar Architects have overseen the conversion and extension of the former care home to form 6 bespoke 1 and 2 bedroom apartments in the heart of the Preston Park Avenue Conservation area. The project involves the extensive renovation along with thermal and acoustic upgrades throughout to deliver a high end sustainable finish. The original Victorian villa has been completely refurbished and restored to compliment and enhance the conservation area.

  • All original external Architectural features have been protected and restored, including stained glass panels, timber sash windows and original doors. Interior features have been restored where ever possible and complemented along side with contemporary fittings within the kitchens and bathrooms.
  • A number of biodiversity measures are install to provide potential homes for bats and swifts along with a series of Bee bricks.
  • The contemporary residential conversion provides full and effective use of the site providing much needed local accomodation to the area whilst bringing a redundant building back into active use.
  • Landscaped buffers have been introduced to soften the edge between the garden and the new build houses to the to the east. Native planting has been used whereever possible.
  • The proposed planting scheme to the gardens includes native shrubs and perennials and is designed to improve the biodiversity of the site.
  • Hard landscaping has been minimised and free draining permeable paving has been used for the primary access. All surface water is retained on site and drained via a series of soak-aways.
  • The Carbon footprint has been considered at an early stage of the design and has formed a basis for the choice of materials palette. Where ever possible, the design has opted for sustainable, locally sourced materials and insulation.

 

Photography by Emma Marshall.  https://emmamarshall.net/

https://www.youarehome.uk/

another developement by Home sussex ltd https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/residential-projects-by-landivar-architects/preston-park-contemporary-housing-scheme-a-contemporary-pair-of-semi-detached-houses-in-preston/

Listed structure – Workers cottage 19/20 The Square is a Heritage residential renovation project incorporating a contemporary extension to a Grade II Listed Building.

The original Listed structure had been used as outbuildings and as a temporary workers cottage and was aquired by our client in a serious stste of disrepair from years of dereliction. After sensitive refurbishment, careful retention of certain architectural elements and materials, the building has been brought back into use as a 3 bedroom dwelling.

The historic structure and the contemporary extension have been connected by a glazed link, mediating between the old and the new. The new structure uses traditional materials and building methods with field flint walling and lime based mortar, detailed in a contemporary manner on a curved wall.

The joinery and fenestration are handmade bespoke items, replicating the original paneled timber doors and Yorkshire sliding sash windows that were key features of the Listed building. The interior has sought to retain visible as much of the original fabric as possible, with the flint Bungaroosh being brought through the glazed link, to connect the two spaces, historic and new.

  • The 2 bedroom house conversion has been carefully negotiated with the LPA Heritage team to provide a  contemporary resdential dwelling whilst respecting the Historic fabric of the Listed structure.
  • Eternal original features have been preserved and restored to their original specification and design with all new additions folowing original building techniques.
  • External walls and glazing are have been thermally upgraded, where permissible under the Listed Building Planning consent. All gas boilers have been removed with the use of high efficiency electric boilers.
  •  Passive cross venitilation has been promoted where ever possible with an efficient central MVHR unit installed to the central core.

Photography by Emma Marshall. https://emmamarshall.net/

Additional Listed building projects:

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/residential-projects-by-landivar-architects/whitehill-oast-residential-architecture-landivar-conversion-contemporary/

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/residential-projects-by-landivar-architects/old-steine-listed-architecture-residential-conservation-landivar-brighton-grade-2-listed-old-steine/

 

The Woodfine house has been designed as a family house for clients and realising a long dream by our clients to self build their own dwelling.

The form of the Woodfine house is defined by the topography the site. The difference in levels from front to back prompted the embedding of the building into the landscape on 3 sides. The design is thus conceived around a courtyard arrangement to bring more light to the heart of the building and an external view from all internal spaces despite the subterranean and deep plan.The two visible elevations from the street are the front, West elevation, facing onto Preston Park and the South flank blank polished white concrete elevation. The solid mass of white concrete contrasts with the large area of glazing to the front elevation. The glazed units to the front at ground and first floor level reflect the trees and landscape of the park opposite, dissolving the volume of the dwelling with the transitional element of the sliding shading screens and the frameless glass balustrade at the balcony level.

Landivar Architects have worked extensively through the Planning process to obtain the necessary consents and then through a detailed construction and working drawing package to facilitate the complex engineering behing the retaining structure.

  • External walls and glazing are highly insulated with a provision for PV and waterheating tubes to the roof.
  • Flat roofs are covered in a green roof hidden behind a parapet wall and planted with sedum and wild grassess.
  • Extensive landscaped planting has been introduced to existing gardens. The proposed planting scheme includes native shrubs and perennials.
  • Hard landscaping has been minimised and free draining hoggin has been used for the primary driveway – it is an easy material to excavate should additional services be required and can be replaced without any wasted materials.

Photography by Emma Marshall. https://emmamarshall.net/

The scheme was consented in December 2016 and is currently on site and under construction.

Landivar Architects were commissioned to deliver the sensitive conversion of two Grade 2 Listed adjoining office buildings to form 11 self contained flats at the Old Steine, Brighton. Located in the heart of Brighton and just around the corner from the Palace Pier, the Grade 2 Listed bow fronted Regency properties had been unsympathetically altered over many years and the project involved careful historic restoration and renovation, along with contemporary interventions to create modern living environments.

The site is located within the Old Steine district, a central thoroughfare that runs north to south and terminates at the Palace pier. The site is set to the east of the original fishing village of Brighthelmstone and was developed within late Georgian and Regency period as part of the fashionable interest with the seaside town of the time.

The arrival of fashionable society in the latter eighteenth century brought considerable change to the Steine as it was the one area which could provide a flat, sheltered promenade for visitors. In 1776 the turf itself was improved and wooden railings were erected to enclose the grassland and to form the public gardens.

The development site is within the curtilage of 23-24 Old Steine, a grade 2 Listed structure 23-24 Old Steine was originally constructed in the early 19th century as a grand family home and subsequently converted into offices with a ground floor shop frontage in the early 20th century.

 

  • The 11 flat conversion has been carefully negotiated with the LPA Heritage team to provide a ix of contemporay resdential units, whilst respecting the Historic fabric of the Listed structure.
  • Eternal original features have been preserved and restored to their original specification and design.
  • External walls and glazing are have been thermally upgraded, where permissible under the Listed Building Planning consent. All gas boilers have been removed with the use of high efficiency electric boilers.
  •  Passive cross venitilation has been promoted where ever possible with an efficient central MVHR unit installed to the central core.

 

Photography by Emma Marshall. https://emmamarshall.net/

Whitehill Oast – Victorian agricultural conversion

Deep in the Kent countryside and in an area of outstanding natural beauty, Landivar Architects were commissioned to convert a derelict Oast building to form 5 houses. Oast structures were traditionally used to dry the hops in the brewing process and are key feature to the Kent agricultural landscape. With their grand proportions and modest utilitarian architectural detailing, the Oast buildings typology provide a fascinating basic structure for generous contemporary living.

We have retained the fundamental aspects of the traditional structure whilst renovating and adapting the structure to accommodate the requirements of a 21st century home.

Whitehill Oast – Victorian conversion provides 5 contemporary dwells whilst bringing back into active use a historic agricultural asset.

  • The 4 bedroom 5 house conversion has been carefully negotiated with the LPA Heritage team to provide 5 contemporay resdential units, whilst respecting the Historic fabric of the Listed structure.
  • Eternal original features have been preserved and restored to their original specification and design. Non-original elements to the structure were removed and the original plan form re-instated.
  • External walls and glazing are have been thermally upgraded, where permissible under the Planning consent.
  •  Passive cross venitilation has been promoted where ever possible with an efficient central MVHR unit installed to the central core.
  • Positioned with in a sensitive biodiversity and ecological area, great care was afforded to the protection and enhancement of the biodiversity with all Ecological and Biodiversity consultant reccommendations adopted within the grounds.

 

Photography by Emma Marshall. https://emmamarshall.net/

Additional Listed building projects:

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/residential-projects-by-landivar-architects/old-steine-listed-architecture-residential-conservation-landivar-brighton-grade-2-listed-old-steine/

https://www.landivar-architects.com/projects/residential-projects-by-landivar-architects/19-20-patcham-contemporary-architects-brighton-listed-structure-workers-cottage/

The Fulbeck Avenue Urban-fringe housing scheme represents the first phase of a development of a former pub car park on the fringes of Worthing and Goring. The six semi-detached and detached properties have a rural aesthetic to address the positioning and mediation between the suburban and rural location. Flint walls and larch cladding are naturally weathered to form a robust and natural palette to blend and complement the existing verdant landscape.

Key design principles:

  •  The former tarmac carpark had little ecological and biodiversity value and it was a key consideration to improve the site that acts as an buffer between the urban to the rural. As a result, it was proposed to adopt all opportunities for ecological enhancement; Wildlife planting, Wildflower areas, Log piles
  • Landscaped buffers have been introduced to soften the edge between the gardens, road and adjoining feilds. The proposed planting scheme to boundary and gardens includes native shrubs and perennials along with the preservation of a number of mature native trees, including oaks and ashes.
  • Swift boxes per dwelling will be placed at roof level to encourage biodiversity on site.
  • Bee bricks per dwelling will be incorporated within the parapet walls adjoining the green roofs.
  • Bat boxes per dwelling will be incorporated at roof level.
  • The location at the fringe of the built up area has informed the aethetic of the proposal with reffences to rural architectural typologies, names barns and storage sheds. This has extended to the external material cladding which is locally sourced larch and traditional flint plinths.
  • Hard landscaping has been minimised and free draining hoggin has been used for the primary shared driveway – it is an easy material to excavate should additional services be required and can be replaced without any wasted materials.
  • External walls and glazing are highly insulated with a central Air Source Heat Pump (ASHP) system providing effecient, sustainable heating and hot water throughout.

The Fulbeck Avenue Urban-fringe housing has developed a n unused brownfield site to form sensitive, rural  contemporary residential housing within a fringe setting.

Site Photography

https://emmamarshall.net/